Month: December 2016

Dust to Dust

2016 is drawing to a close, and what a year it has been! Not everything that happened has made it onto this website, so before I unveil the final drawing of the year, I thought I would start with a recap of some personal artistic highlights.

For the first few months of 2016, I focussed on my Traces series, which culminated in a show that opened in late March. I then joined the Island Illustrators and had the chance to contribute to their colouring book, as well as a second major project that I will talk about in a week or so. I also took my first stab at juried shows, and got work accepted at both the Sooke and Sidney fine arts shows, the two major events of the region. One of my pieces made it into the finalist exhibition of the Nonesuch Art on Paper Awards, with shows in Parrsboro, NS, and Montréal. Lastly, in September, I became an Active member of the Canadian Federation of Artists, and two of the drawings from my Traces series were part of the Federation’s Sketch show in November.

Closer to home, my art has been on display in venues in and around Oak Bay throughout the year: the Spring and Fall Studio Tours, the Bowker Creek Brush-up, and shows with other Oak Bay Artists in places like Municipal Hall and the Neighbourhood Learning Centre. So perhaps appropriately, my final drawing of 2016 celebrates Garry Oak, the tree that (I assume) gave this part of the world its English name.

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New Worlds

Remember when I talked about being a planner?

This drawing was conceived for an upcoming group show that has a Canadian theme, so a maple leaf seemed a good way to start. I also liked the idea of drawing ice, so having found myself some leaves, I put them in water and stuck them in the freezer, curious to see what would happen. This led to a very fun photo shoot, and also some beautiful pictures.

leaves-in-ice

I decided on the red leaf, which was a joy to draw, but when it came to the ice, all those bubbles seemed daunting. So starting on the background, I thought I would try for black ice: that smooth, clear stuff that is utterly see-through, and that likes to coat roads below the snow in the winter. Read more